Bust out your steak knives, and tuck your napkin into your shirt collars my fine friends because today I have the world’s juiciest Grilled Sirloin Steak with Chimichurri Sauce made with hazelnut oil. It is off the chain delicious! Grilled Sirloin Steak, slices and drizzled with chimichurri sauce on a white dish cloth with black stripes.

This post is sponsored by La Tourangelle Artisan Oils. All opinions expressed here are my own. I was compensated for my time.

I’m going to let you in on a secret. One of the leanest beef steaks also happens to be one of the most delicious steaks and it’s about half the price of tenderloin or rib eye steak! I know that sounds too good to be true, so I don’t blame you if you’re skeptical when I say that it happens to be great on the grill. But it is true my friends, and it’s hiding right in plain sight! It’s your average grocery store sirloin steak.

Top Sirloin Steak that's been grilled and is now resting before it's sliced

What is A Sirloin Steak?

Sirloin steak comes from the Sirloin Primal which is one of the two sub primal cuts of beef which, along with the Short Loin, makes up the Loin of the beef. The Loin is the section of back muscles between the steer’s ribs and tail bone. The sirloin is the section closer to the tail. If you’re thinking in terms of the human body the Sirloin would be called the small of the back or lower back.

At the grocery store you’ll see a few different steaks with the word “sirloin” on the label so I need to clarify a few things.

Sirloin Tips are not the same thing as Sirloin

Sirloin Tips are actually part of the round or leg of the steer, so they are more tough than sirloin. You’ll often see Sirloin Tips pre-marinated at the meat counter, and this is for a reason! They need to be tenderized as much as possible.

Sirloin, Top Sirloin or Top Sirloin Butt

Top Sirloin (or often just plain sirloin) is the type of sirloin we’re looking for in this recipe. This steak has a lot of different names, but you’ll usually see the word “top” on the label somewhere. It can be sold with or without the cap or Coulotte attached. I prefer it with the cap. Here I wanted to have a larger steak, so I bought a 2 pound steak. If your grocery store has removed the cap, it will likely not weigh 2 pounds.

A close up view of sliced grilled sirloin steak with green chimichurri sauce on it

Bottom Sirloin or Petite Sirloin

This is from the lower portion of the sirloin. It is more tough than the top sirloin. It’s made up of the ball tip, tri tip and flap. In the supermarket you’ll see this called the petit sirloin, tri tip or sometimes the sirloin flap or sirloin bavette. I don’t recommend the bottom sirloin for this recipe

Because sirloin is very lean, I quickly grilled the sirloin steak over a hot fire, then served paired it with a delicious and easy chimichurri sauce.

a sliced steak on a black baking sheet with a bowl of chimichurri sauce

What is Chimichurri?

Chimichurri is a green herb sauce originating from Argentina which is served with grilled steak. The basic ingredients are parsley, garlic, olive oil, salt and vinegar. It often has hot chili and other herbs as well. Although they look the same, chimichurri is not at all like pesto which is made with basil, cheese and pine nuts. Instead Chimichurri is bright and tart due to the inclusion of vinegar, and it is more liquid and oily than pesto which is much thicker.

In my version of chimichurri today I used the roasted hazelnut oil from La Tourangelle. This is one of La Tourangelle’s delicious varieties of heart healthy roasted nut oils handcrafted in California. To make the oil, the hazelnuts are slowly roasted, expeller pressed and then lightly filtered. As a result, the oil has a rich hazelnut flavor which really compliments the grilled steak. It’s almost buttery!

As I mentioned last week, I am also watching my saturated fat. Here I’m pairing a leaner cut of meat, sirloin, which has less than 2 grams of saturated fat with a healthy plant based source of unsaturated fats for flavor and health!

How to Make Chimichurri with Hazelnut Oil

  1. Do not use a blender: I tried making this chimichurri in the blender, but the herbs got so finely chopped that the mixture more resembled a green smoothie than a rustic herb paste. a view into the food processor with chopped herbs in it
  2. Food Processor: I had better luck when I used my food processor. First add the parsley, and garlic. I also added cilantro, while not strictly authentic, it is commonly added to chimichurri, and I really enjoy the flavor it adds to the sauce. If you don’t like cilantro, just add in more parsley instead.
  3. Add in Liquids Second: Once the herbs and garlic are pulsed several times you can add in the hazelnut oil, vinegar and water. While water is not a traditional ingredient in chimichurri, I wanted to keep the overall calories in check so I didn’t want to add more oil to thin the sauce. Continue pulsing or puree in short bursts until the sauce looks like a rustic sauce like paste and the herbs are finely chopped. How to make chimichurri in a food processor. Once you add the liquids to the chimichurri it will become more sauce-like
  4. Chop By Hand: If you don’t have a food processor, you can do this chimichurri by hand. Just finely mince the garlic and herbs and then stir in a bowl with the oil, water and vinegar.
  5. Make Ahead: You can make the chimichurri ahead, but the color of the green herbs will darken as they sit. It will still taste great though! I enjoyed the leftovers for a few days, and the flavors were still awesome!

How To Grill Sirloin Steak

First preheat the grill to high heat for a gas grill or medium high for a charcoal fire. Clean the grill grates well.

sprinkling salt on steak

Sprinkle the steak with salt and pepper. I like to use coarse kosher salt for sprinkling because it is easy to hold onto and spread evenly. If you do not have kosher salt, make sure you read why you can’t just go and sub in table salt instead.

Grill the steak, rotating a quarter turn to make those fancy hash marks after a minute or two. Let the steak cook for 3 ½ to 5 minutes on the first side. Then Flip it over and let it cook on the second side. Rotate a quarter turn again on the second side if you like.

How To Take The Internal Temperature of Steak with an Instant Read Thermometer

  • After three minutes on the second side, take the internal temperature of the sirloin steak. It should get to 135 degrees for medium-rare to rare.
  • It’s important to make sure the sensor is fully in the center of the meat. Some analog dial style instant read thermometers’ sensors are actually about 1 inch from the tip of the probe. Look at the shaft of the probe, and if there is a little super tiny circular indentation about 1 inch up, that’s the sensor! If yours doesn’t have that, the sensor is in the end of the shaft.
  • For a steak like this, I like to pick it up with the tongs, then slide the thermometer into the steak horizontally so I am sure I reach the center of the steak with the sensor, and it isn’t going past the center and reading the temp on the other side!

 

Look for La Tourangelle Roasted Hazelnut Oil in your supermarket oil isle, or order it online here.

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close up of sirloin steak with chimichurri

grilled sirloin steak with chimichurri

  • Author: Katie
  • Prep Time: 15
  • Cook Time: 10
  • Total Time: 30
  • Yield: 6 servings 1x
  • Category: Main Course
  • Method: Grilling
  • Cuisine: South American

Description

The world’s juiciest Grilled Sirloin Steak with Chimichurri Sauce made with hazelnut oil. It is off the chain delicious!


Scale

Ingredients

1 large sirloin steak, about 1.75 to 2 pounds

1 ½ teaspoon coarse kosher salt, divided

½ teaspoon pepper

2 whole cloves garlic, smashed, peeled and chopped

1 cup loosely packed parsley sprigs

1 cup loosely packed cilantro sprigs

1/3 cup La Tourangelle Roasted Hazelnut Oil or Olive Oil

1/4 cup water

3 tablespoons white vinegar


Instructions

  1. Preheat grill to high heat.
  2. Lay sirloin on a clean platter or baking sheet. Sprinkle all over with 1 teaspoon salt, and pepper.
  3. Combine garlic, parsley, cilantro and the remaining ½ teaspoon salt in a food processor. Pulse until coarsely chopped. Add in oil, water, vinegar and pulse until it is moistened and the herbs are finely chopped. Scrape down and pulse again if necessary, to ensure the herbs are finely chopped.
  4. Grill, turning once, until a thermometer inserted into the center reaches 135 degrees for medium rare to medium, about 3 ½ to 5 minutes per side.
  5. Let the steak rest on a platter or carving board at least 5 minutes before slicing. Serve with the chimichurri sauce.

Notes

To take internal temperature of the steak, pick it up with tongs, then slide the thermometer into the steak horizontally so the sensor reaches the center of the steak, and it isn’t going past the center and reading the temp on the other side! You’re looking for 135 degrees to be the coolest reading.


Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 3.5 ounces plus 2 tablespoons chimichurri
  • Calories: 217
  • Sugar: 0
  • Fat: 16 grams
  • Saturated Fat: 6 grams
  • Carbohydrates: 0 g
  • Fiber: 0 g
  • Protein: 19 g